« Wellington invades France - sand makes success possible | Main | Earth Science Week and Earth Science Literacy »

October 10, 2010

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Thanks Michael for expanding on the EPOD link. Looks like a interesting and colorful alternative for beach re-nourishment. I wonder if the micro pulverizing of the glass to make it safe to walk on is any more energy intensive than what is done with recycled glass to make new glass products?

Here's a PDF paper on Broward County's glass/sand research:


https://www.broward.org/WasteAndRecycling/Recycling/Documents/literature_review.pdf

Thanks for the link, Jules!

And the question about energy use is a good one, but, as always on this topic, not easy to answer, given all the unkown variables of transport requirements etc.

I never thought of there being a need to replenish beaches, so this entire concept is new to me. And the whole of idea of glass beaches seems even stranger, but does sound like an inventive way of recycling.

Yes, inventive indeed - but largely stuck between politics and economics!

I did apost last year on beach nourishment that includes some links to other sources - see

https://throughthesandglass.typepad.com/through_the_sandglass/2009/05/beach-nourishment-and-sediment-budgets.html

And the question about energy use is a good one, but, as always on this topic, not easy to answer, given all the unkown variables of transport requirements etc.

Fort Bragg is in South Carolina, not California.

Please see Fort Bragg, California: https://www.fortbragg.com/

Love Kauai's amazing Glass Beach, great place for fun photos too:
https://lookintohawaii.com/hawaii/9160/glass-beach-beaches-kauai-eleele-hi

The comments to this entry are closed.

Blog about copy
Share |
Cover 2

UCP

OUP

StatCounter